Showing posts with label Short Stories. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Short Stories. Show all posts

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Ghost Box


Hello! It's been a crazy last couple of months to the say the least. Work and a late fall move have definitely kept me pretty busy. So, outside of a miracle, I'm super excited to finally see my novella Ghost Box enter into the wild. Definitely a lot of blood, sweat and tears, plus a ton of hours went into making this thing be the best it can be. The M.S. Corley cover alone is worth the price of admission.

What's Ghost Box about?

In the summer of '92, a young girl named Isabelle disappears into a vacant building and is never seen again. She becomes another name alongside many others who have vanished when stepping through the building's doors. 

Boyd Dwyer knows a thing about missing people. At least he did when he was a cop, but that was before Morgan died, and before his 'little drinking problem' forced him into an early retirement. Now the only job he can get is the one no one else wants -- protecting a building with a violent and disturbing history. 

It's not so bad until he starts getting phone calls late at night. It seems someone really wants to talk to Boyd and confess something awful. 

Will he answer? 

The book is up for pre-order over on Amazon and will be out December 14th.


A few people have reached out to me asking how they can help. The answer is simple -- word of mouth! Tweet, Share, Instagram, Facebook, Email or send a smoke signal if you read the book and want to let people know about it. Also, a review or two doesn't hurt, but most important is just getting the word out. Click on the book icon above to bring you straight to the Amazon page!

I'll leave you with an excerpt for chapter one. 

I hope you enjoy!



                                                                     -1-
                                                                                
                                                              {1992}

On her second pass down the hill, Isabelle saw that her mother was still talking to the strange man. Where he had come from, she didn’t know. He didn’t live in their neighborhood — Isabelle knew that much. He was slender, with a long neck and a bulbous head almost like a grasshopper. He wore dirty jeans and a leather jacket even though it was ninety and humid. He had his long, dark, wet hair pushed back behind one ear with a cigarette holding it in place. As Isabelle neared, he was leaning over and whispering something into her mother’s ear as the wisps of her hair blew up around his face. He smiled as they seemed to tickle his chin, then reached up, and tenderly pushed them away with a finger. He whispered something else, and her mother laughed so hard she had to cover her mouth as her face flushed. 
Isabelle rode right up onto the curb where the two were standing in Mrs. Baker’s driveway, but her mother wasn’t paying attention. Not even when she squeezed the horn on her bike, which was pink with a white leather seat. Isabelle turned and pedaled back toward the end of the street. She hopped the sidewalk and started down Jasper, the street that connected to her own. Near the end it curved almost like a cul-de-sac, except the outlet road rose upward toward a large building that sat in between the trees. In the crook of the bend was a granite sign that had Lansing High School chiseled into it. She wasn’t supposed to stray this far from her house — the boundary was supposed to be down to the end of her street and back — but her mother hadn’t said a word when Isabelle had first pedaled out of her sight. 
She stood up off her seat as she made her climb up the hill. The gray T-shirt she wore clung to the perspiration on her back. When the road finally flattened out, she glided over the fresh black pavement of the high school parking lot. 
Once she had caught her breath, she doubled back and paused near the top of the hill leading down to the street below. This is what made the climb all worth it. She pedaled twice, and then took her hands off the handlebars as the bike began to catch speed. The momentum built and she rode the descent all the way back to her street. When Mrs. Baker’s driveway came back into view, she squeezed the horn on the bike to announce her arrival. Her mother turned on her heels; she had the look on her face she always got when Isabelle said or did something that embarrassed her, but made her angry, too. It was the same look her mother gave after her fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Newcomb, had called the house wondering why Isabelle hadn’t brought a lunch for three days. 
Isabelle!” her mother said with her hands on her hips and her head cocked to one side. “The parade is coming. Get off the bike, please.”
Strange Man took a drag on his cigarette and gave a chuckle, as if this all amused him somehow. He was squinting over the smoke and staring off down the street toward the oncoming parade, though nothing was visible yet.
“One more loop,” Isabelle said, and began pedaling away.
“Isabelle, I’m serious!” her mother called, but Isabelle was already heading back towards the end of her street. Behind her she could hear the distant sound of the drums from the marching band. At the top of the climb she slowed and used the back of her arm to wipe the sweat from her brow. She’d have to ask her mom about getting a glass of water when she got back. Maybe another loop wasn’t such a good idea after all. Her legs felt like stretched rubber and she didn’t feel much like pedaling anymore.
She let the wheels carry her as she headed toward the breezeway in the front of the building. Her gaze drifted to a figure standing in the vestibule of the front entrance. As soon as Isabelle saw him, her pulse leapt, and she almost lost control of the bike. She steadied herself and went about six feet past the building’s entrance before turning back around toward the breezeway.
The man was still there.
It was difficult to make out his face due to the reflection of the afternoon sun on the glass and the shade from the roof of the breezeway. Isabelle looked away and fixed her eyes on the row of houses she could see from way up on the hill. 
She kept the man just to the corner of her vision. 
The brassy sounds of the marching band were louder now. They would be passing the street for the school soon. The thought crossed her mind that her mother was going to be mad that she was missing the parade. Isabelle didn’t much care. She wanted to be far away from here, at Hoyer Field maybe, having a cookout with her friends Emma and Kaylee, and not watching the fire department toss out stale candy to all her neighbors on the sidewalk. 
When the machine gun precision of the drums grew faint she heard the door to the vestibule unlatch. The man stood there on the walk. He had a young face, though it kind of reminded her of her father’s; at least, her memory of it from the last time she had seen him. Maybe it was the tiny smirk at the corner of the man’s mouth or how he wore his short black hair combed neatly to the side. She thought she had seen her father’s hair that way, but perhaps it was just a memory of looking at a picture.
“Hello,” he said and stuck his hands into the front pockets of his trousers.
Isabelle didn’t reply. She wasn’t sure what to make of the man. Maybe he was a teacher; that was possible, right? Yet, it was the first week of July and school was out. He started towards her, slowly, like he was on a stroll. He kept the smirk on his face.
“Missing the parade,” he said.
“I hate parades.”
The man shrugged, and kicked at some loose gravel on the walk. “I can’t say I’m too big on them myself.”
“Are you a teacher?” she asked. “Don’t you know school’s out?”
He craned his neck to look back at the building and admired it like he was seeing it for the first time. “Oh, so that’s what they’re using it for now, huh? Interesting.” He looked back her way. “I’m not a teacher.”
“What are you doing here?”
“Waiting,” he said. “For you.”
Isabelle felt her balance on the bike waver and she had to plant both feet down on the cement to keep upright. “You were?”
“Yeah,” he said and gestured with his hand. “I saw you pedaling up and around here and then I said to myself, my Isabelle has gotta be thirsty.”
She frowned. “How do you know my name?”
“Why, because you told it to me.”
“No I didn’t.”
“Sure you did. You were thinking in your head that you wanted to tell me your name and I read it there. It’s no big deal. Say, would you like to get a glass of water?”
Isabelle ran a chalky tongue over her dry lips. “My mom said I shouldn’t go with people I don’t know.”
“That’s really good advice. Smart woman, your mom. Maybe we could get to know each other? Look, we already have something in common — we both hate parades.”
“I am kinda thirsty,” Isabelle said.
“I bet you are.”
He crouched down so he was eye level with her, and for the briefest of moments she thought she saw something flicker across the man’s face like when the lights in the house flashed during a storm.  He extended a hand out, palm upwards, and she stared down at it. Isabelle thought about what her mother had said about strangers, but her mother was talking to someone she didn’t know, and she seemed okay. 
Isabelle climbed off the bike and let it fall with a clatter onto the pavement. The man’s palm was cool to the touch as she watched her hand disappear into his and he started to lead her back toward the building.
“What’s your name?” she asked.
“Oh,” he said. “I’m being rude, aren’t I? I know your name and you don’t even know mine. You can call me Badge. All my friends do.”




Friday, August 1, 2014

Camp is over



Hello,

Step inside out of the sun why don't you and grab something cold to drink. You don't have to stay long as this will be a relatively short post to update what I've been working on.

Yesterday was the official end of Camp NaNoWriMo (I'm sure not going to miss spelling that out all the time), and I have to say not only was I impressed with how productive it was for me, but that I also got to meet some really cool, and awesome writers in my "cabin."

The past few years I've tried to do NaNoWriMo in November, but always found myself losing steam by the time the holiday rolled in. I spoke a bit in my last post or two about how I had to change my writing habits and so far it's really paid off and having all the support from the other writers who I did NaNoWriMo with was huge.

Also, committing to write everyday was a challenge at first and I had to remind myself to stay productive even on the days the words just weren't there.

So, what have I got to show for myself?

A 20k+ word novella call "Ghost Box."

I ended up hitting my NaNO goal early in the month and used the last few weeks to get through another pass on the manuscript. Then I started sending it out to some beta readers so I could get feedback. I'll be honest I'm super excited about this project and really enjoy the direction it's gone in so far.

Sometimes I feel like I'm a method actor, at least on this piece. The subject matter of the book is pretty heavy and the last few days I've been going over another pass on it have really left me feeling drained by the time I've finished. It's worth it though and I like to think the book is better for it.

The goal moving forward is to have a book cover designed and to get the manuscript fully edited for content and to clean up any typos.

Then it's on it's way to the readers where hopefully it'll thrive. We'll see.

What will I be doing? Well, writing the next thing of course.

See you guys soon!

Authors Note: This is more of an observation, but when will the ice cream man realize that no one carries cash anymore? Talk about a buzzkill. 

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Rusty Nail


Wow, it's been a really long time since I've written anything here on the blog. My apologies. Let me blow some of the dust off the furniture and invite you back in. Nice and comfy? Good. Maybe you'd enjoy a story. If so, you're in luck. The folks over at the Rusty Nail have published my short story The Boys in their February 2013 issue. If you like dark, creepy, post WWII type of stories this may be right up your alley. If not, don't do yourself a disservice and not pick up a copy. Support the other independent writers in the issue, not just me, and for less than $10 why wouldn't you?

Here's the link: Rusty Nail February 2013

Read, share, and enjoy.

Friday, October 5, 2012

Night Call


So, this is out today. Cover art by my good friend Chip Carey. 

The kind people over at JukePop Serials are publishing a novella I wrote called Night Call. The story is being released in serialized format, i.e one chapter at a time, and will be on their site alongside other fiction of vastly different genres. 

If you feel so inclined, and it would be much appreciated, head on over to JukePop and give it a read. If you like stories about crime, guns, revenge, and/or just enjoy what I do, please leave a comment and vote for my story. 

If not, I won't hold it against you... okay, yeah I will. 

Voting is pretty simple. Follow these steps:

1) Head over to JukePop.

2) Sign up for an account. (It's free).

3) Search for my story (Night Call).

4) Read/enjoy.

5) Vote.

That's it! Simple and you get to inflate my ego a little bit.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

5 To Try


List of five things I’ve never done (successfully) as a writer that I’d like to try:

1. Write a western.

2. Write a comic. (Need not be an ongoing – could be a mini-series or a one shot).

3. Write a television pilot.

4. Write a short story by hand.*

5. Write for an ongoing television series.

* Have done this, but not since I was sixteen years old. My hand tends to cramp up. Note my emphasis on doing something “successfully.” For my purposes, success indicates getting paid… not because I’m money obsessed, but because a paycheck is an indicator of professional level work. 

At the moment I’m not working on any of those things. I’ve got my hands full working on a few short story ideas and researching an idea for a novella. But hey, a guy can dream right?

Monday, August 13, 2012

The Call of Lovecraft


​So a couple of weeks ago an anthology came out that included a short story I wrote called The Clearing. It was a ton of fun to write and pretty surreal seeing something I wrote in print.
My friend Greg's blog included a short piece that I contributed​ on the writing of the story. Lovecraft Promo.
You can pick up a copy of the book currently on amazon. It's also available for your tablet of choosing.  The Call of Lovecraft.